Which Wooden Flooring For You?

flooringIf you are arranging a hardwood floor project, you are going to be forgiven for feeling that the entire thing is much more complex than you’d ever anticipated! Several years back, a timber floor was a timber floor. In this era, there are many different types of wood floor: engineered hardwood flooring, solid hardwood flooring, brushed and oiled hardwood flooring, tongue and groove hardwood flooring and so forth. So, where do you start when you are attempting to work out that wooden for could be most suitable for you?

The first question to ask is will the timber flooring be outside or inside. That might sound like an odd question, but outdoor wood flooring is present, in the form of decking. Decking, like floors, comes in a complete range of choices, which you’ll find here, however for the purpose of this guide we’ll assume you are undertaking an indoor hardwood flooring endeavor.

Solid or engineered?

Among the most basic decisions you’re going to need to make is the choice between engineered and solid hardwood flooring. In a nutshell, solid wood flooring is made from single planks of wood and engineered wood flooring is constructed from layers of different types of wood which are secured together. You’ll find a complete, comprehensive guide to what’s engineered hardwood flooring.

Suffice to say that solid hardwood floors is exactly what its name suggests, strong, wooden floorboards cut from solid parts of the wood of your own choice. Even though the differences between solid and engineered wood floors are rather significant, the sole over-riding factor to bear in mind is that engineered timber flooring can be used in areas where temperatures and humidity levels fluctuate, whereas solid wood should not. Furthermore, if you have under floor heatingsystem, then designed wood flooring is advocated over solid wood flooring.

Although you’ll discover that plank widths, plank thicknesses and plank lengths of engineered and solid wood flooring change, which you opt for will depend to a large extent on the appearance and durability you desire. When it comes to durability, solid hardwood is longer lasting than engineered hardwood floors because it can be sanded, re-sanded and re-finished more often than engineered wood flooring. Nevertheless, an engineered board with a thick lamella or top layer should be able to withstand a good 5 or 6 sandings in its lifetime.

Which end?

Both solid and engineered wood floors include distinct coating, or completing choices and some of the very common you’re going to come up from are:

Unfinished

Engineered hardwood floors is timber flooring that’s included with no finish. This is the best flooring solution if you are looking for a blank canvas to the flooring project.

Oiled

Oiled finish hardwood floors gives a warm, natural appearance. An oiled end makes the actual character of the timber stand out with no shine. A hardwearing alternative, as a result of the durability that the oil brings to the timber, Engineered finish hardwood flooring is perfect if you are trying to maintain and increase the natural good appearance of the timber.

Brushed and oiled

Brushed and oiled finish flooring is wood flooring that has been brushed to open the grain, then oiled to create the finish. Brushing is carried out by machine and helps improve the grain of the timber, giving brushed and oiled wood flooring an extremely textured look.

Lacquered

Lacquered finish hardwood floors is perfect solution if you’re searching for a low maintenance option. Essentially a pre-varnished flooring option, lacquered wood flooring normally results in a sleek, quite shiny finish although there are matt lacquers available. This choice is ideal for high traffic areas of the home.

UV Lacquered

UV (or ultra violet treated ) lacquered finish wood flooring is ideal if you’re concerned about the negative consequences on your flooring brought on by sunlight. With pretty much the exact same appearance as lacquered hardwood flooring, UV lacquered wood flooring has the added benefit of preventing any damage brought on by UV light.This finish is well worth considering if you’re buying dark coloured floor.

Hand distressed

Hand distressed finish wood flooring is wood flooring which has gone through a deliberate process of damaging to make it look old. This sort of flooring has a worn, uneven, irregular look.

What grade?

As soon as you’ve decided on the best end for you, then you will need to take into account the grade of wood which would best suit your project and, of course, your budget. Wood flooring drops into 4 grades:

  • Prime or AB Tier
  • Select or ABC Tier
  • Organic or ABCD Tier
  • and Rustic or CD Tier

Here are a Few of the features of each tier:

Cut from the middle of the log, that this caliber of timber is extremely uniform in its physical appearance and contains hardly any knots. Often called ABC grade, this timber includes some knots plus some color variation.
Organic Grade comes alongside the timber flooring grading ladder. Frequently known as mill jog or ABCD grade, this timber tier sports knots up to 30mm in size, comprises sap and contains some color variants.
Rustic (or nation fashion ) is your last grade for timber flooring. As its name implies, this caliber of timber has color variant, sap and generally has knots up to 35mm in size.

Which colour?

Wood flooring colors range from pale blondes to black in its natural state and out of reds, to greens, to blues and to yellows if you are prepared to opt for artificially coloured options.

The colour you choose is going to depend to a large extent on personal preference and the look you’re trying to attain. Paradoxically, contemporary interiors might call to the lightest of forests or the most mysterious, whereas a country style or rustic interior layout would normally involve a more gold, red colouration to complete the look. Irrespective of your selection, you can be sure there will be a wood flooring colour to satisfy your requirements.

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